Home > State/National Park quarters > State quarters > 1999 > brand-new Jersey > 1999 brand-new Jersey 24 Karat Gold quarter - Philadelphia
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new Jersey is the 3rd coin honored in the State quarter Program. New Jersey validated the structure on December 18, 1787. It is preceeded by Delaware and Pennsylvania. The brand-new Jersey commemorative quarter attributes a calculation of George Washington cross the Delaware River. The is based on the 1851 paint by Emanuel Leutz and also shows Washington was standing in his watercraft accompanied through members that the colonial Army. Of unique note, the obverse likewise features a portrait that George Washington - making this a rare instance of a turn coin honoring the same human on both the obverse and the reverse. The only other instance in American coinage is the Lincoln Cent through the Lincoln Memorial ~ above the reverse. Every uncirculated quarter is layered 7 time in pure 24 karat gold. Each coin is encapsulated to defend it"s condition.In December 1997, America"s most adventurous coin program became a reality as soon as President Clinton signed law authorizing the U.S. Mint to issue the put in order 50 State quarters collection. Starting in January 1999, every of the 50 states in the Union will be honored on a distinct Quarter disagreement commemorative coin. 5 states will be featured every year, based upon the bespeak in i m sorry they ratified the constitution or became states. Due to the wild minting schedule, each State Quarter will be minted for only about 10 weeks. As a result, mintages of every quarter only are come be simply a fraction of the "normal" quarters are. Regular concern coins will be minted at both the Philadelphia and also the Denver Mints. On the front, otherwise recognized as the obverse, the details mintmarks have the right to be found to the appropriate of George Washington"s portrait. The little "P" shows the Philadelphia Mint and also the little "D" refers to the Denver.